Friday December 19, 2014
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iPollenCount Application

IPollenCount Application

The iPollenCount app is a user-friendly application for individuals with allergies, specifically, those affecting the eyes (allergic conjunctivitis), the nose (allergic rhinitis), the skin (atopic dermatitis/eczema and/or hives) and for those suffering from asthma. This app will help you understand and correlate your allergies and asthma with the local pollen count. It will then be able to graphically display your symptom scores, for each of the various allergies and/or asthma, with the pollen count over the past week. The report can then be sent, via email, to your physician or healthcare provider in order to monitor the clinical impact of the pollen on your allergic symptoms.

  • An estimated 15 million people in the U.S. suffer from atopic dermatitis, and more than half of these individuals already have or will develop asthma or allergic rhinitis.

  • Chronic hand eczema may be the most common symptom of atopic dermatitis in many adult cases, but eczema can also effect the neck, feet, and creases of the knees and elbows.

  • Chronic hand eczema may be the most common symptom of atopic dermatitis in many adult cases, but eczema can also effect the neck, feet, and creases of the knees and elbows.

  • Atopic dermatitis rarely occurs in infants under 6 weeks of age.

  • 60% of patients with atopic dermatitis develops signs of this condition before their first birthday.

  • Contact dermatitis affects more than 10% of the U.S. population.

  • In the workplace, contact dermatitis accounts for almost one quarter of occupational disease cases.

  • At least 3,000 chemicals in use today can potentially triggers allergic contact dermatitis symptoms.

  • As many as 14 million Americans experience sensitivity to latex and other rubber compounds.

  • At least 10% of the U.S. population suffers from a sensitivity to nickel.

  • Mascara, eyeshadow, and eye pencils often contain nickel and can therefore cause facial dermatitis in sensitized individuals.

  • If you overuse topical medications, your skin may absorb some of the allergens that these products contain.

  • If your skin is already inflamed or irritated, it may be more susceptible to contact dermatitis.

  • More than half the cases of contact dermatitis affect the hands, due to increased exposure.

  • Oral antihistamines can often relieve the itching symptoms that frequently aggravate dermatitis conditions.

  • Upper respiratory viral infections, such as the common cold, are the most common trigger of acute urticaria in children.

  • Avoid using soaps or cosmetics that contain lanolin because it is one of the most common allergens.

  • 125 people in the U.S. die each year from food-induced anaphylactic reactions.

  • Anaphylaxis is a severe systemic allergic reaction resulting from exposure to allergens that is rapid in onset and can cause death.

  • Anaphylaxis is triggered by a wide range of allergens including but not limited to foods, insect stings and bites, medications, and latex. While less common, anaphylactic reactions can also be triggered by exercise.

  • Anaphylaxis occurs most commonly in the community setting, in the absence of a health care professional, so it is essential for patients at risk for anaphylaxis to be identified and prepared in the event of an emergency

  • Birch Pollen sufferers may also react to kiwi, apples, pears, peaches, plums, coriander, fennel, parsley, celery, cherries, carrots, hazelnuts and almonds.

  • It is more effective to avoid allergy triggers than to treat the misery that comes from exposure.

  • Food, medications, and insect stings are the three most common triggers of anaphylaxis.

  • Insect allergy treatment is nearly 98% effective.

  • Important as an ongoing risk factor, is the continued underutilization of epinephrine for both acute and long-term management of insect anaphylaxis.

  • Food hypersensitivity is a leading cause of anaphylaxis.

  • Common triggers of anaphylaxis are: insect stings, foods, medications and latex.

  • Anaphylaxis is treated with epinephrine because it is a hormone that strengthens the heart, opens the airways, helps relax the immune system and decreases swelling.

  • In a recent epidemiological study, 40% of the population of the United States have ocular symptoms associated with allergy.

  • Symptoms such as redness over your eyeballs and the underside of your eyelids, as well as swollen, itchy and tearing eyes, are characteristics of allergic conjunctivitis.

  • "Contact allergy of the eyelids and the conjunctiva is the most common form of allergic reaction observed in ophthalmology."

  • Antihistamines do not help with nasal congestion, decongestants and nasal steroids do!

  • Increased temperature and CO2 is associated with increased pollen from ragweed plants.

  • The allergen from peanut, soy and wheat contains protein components that are highly cross-reactive with species-specific pollen allergens.

  • One of the proteins in hazelnut is structurally so similar to the major allergen in birch pollen that neither laboratory tests, nor allergic subjects, can distinguish between them.

  • Individuals who are allergic to birch pollen may have itching in the mouth from both hazelnut and almond.

  • Young people who are sensitized and have a clinical allergy to peanut, but who can eat other nuts/almonds without complications, should be able to continue to eat these.

  • In some cases it, it is necessary to consider whether a challenge is needed in order to determine what kind of nuts the child needs to avoid.

  • In the case of allergy/sensitization to walnut, analyze for IgE to pecan.

  • Clinical allergy to wheat is rare, but non-symptomatic sensitization is common.

  • Weed pollens, especially ragweed, accounts for up to three-quarters of seasonal allergic rhinitis cases in the U.S.

  • The presence of weed pollen may continue in warmer climates through December, in the absence of an early frost.

  • The most important weeds that trigger symptoms of allergic rhinitis are ragweeds.

  • If your symptoms get worse during the spring, the probable cause is tree pollen.

  • Hot weather increases pollination, whereas cooler temperatures reduce the amount of pollen that plants produce.

  • Your chances of developing an allergy is 1 in 3 if 1 of your parents has an allergy.

  • If you are allergic to grass pollen you might also reach to peaches, celery, tomatoes,melons and oranges.

  • Ragweed pollen cross reacts with bananas and melons.

  • About a third of patients who have "hay fever" allergies to pollen may also develop itchy mouth and throats when they eat certain fruits.

  • Children allergic to peanut and other tree nuts seem quite often to tolerate almonds, and many can eat marzipan.

  • With animal food allergens such as milk, egg and fish, higher IgE levels increase the likelihood that the patient will experience symptoms from the allergen in general.

  • Those who are allergic to birch pollen and react to hazelnut, peanut or soy due to cross-reaction with birch pollen are, in general, at no greater risk of severe symptoms after intake of these food allergens

  • The reason why birch allergic individuals with cross reaction to peanut, hazelnut or soy do not react with severe symptoms is that the birch-homologous allergens are usually unstable.

  • If an individual has clinical symptoms and antibodies against only tree nuts, there is no reason to advise against peanut if the child has previously eaten peanut and tolerated this.

  • If a child has shown reaction to 1 kind of tree nut, but tolerates other kinds, the child should be allowed to continue to eat these.

  • If there is a great concern within the family regarding more general nut allergy, analysis of the presence of species-specific IgE against all nuts can be performed.

  • High levels of IgE antibodies against an allergy-causing nut is usually related to low levels of IgE to other nuts as well.

  • In the case of allergy/sensitization to pistachio, always analyze for IgE antibodies to cashew.

  • Although most children lose their sensitivity to milk and eggs by age 3, food allergies involving peanuts, fish, shellfish, and tree nuts can last a lifetime.

  • An allergic reaction to food happens when your immune system mistakes a food protein for something harmful, triggering an allergic response.

  • Milk, eggs, fish, shellfish, wheat, soy and nuts are the most common cause of food allergies.

  • Approximately 34.1 million Americans have been diagnosed with asthma by a health professional during their lifetime.

  • An estimated 300 million people worldwide suffer from asthma, with 250,000 annual deaths attributed to the disease.

  • Workplace conditions, such as exposure to fumes, gases or dust, are responsible for 11% of asthma cases worldwide.

  • About 70% of asthmatics also have allergies. More than 90% of asthmatic children have allergies.

  • The prevalence of asthma increased 75% from 1980-1994.

  • Asthma rates in children under the age of five have increased more than 160% from 1980-1994.

  • Asthma accounts for approximately 500,000 hospitalizations each year.

  • 13 million school days are missed each year due to asthma.

  • Asthma accounts for about 10.1 million missed work days for adults annually.

  • Asthma was responsible for 3,384 deaths in the United States in 2005.

  • The annual economic cost of asthma is $19.7 billion. Direct costs make up $14.7 billion of that total, and indirect costs such as lost productivity add another $5 billion.

  • Prescription drugs represented the largest single direct medical expenditure related to asthma, over $6 billion.

  • In 2006, asthma prevalence was 20.1% higher in African Americans than in whites.

  • The prevalence of asthma in adult females was 23% greater than the rate in males, in 2006.

  • Approximately 40% of children who have asthmatic parents will develop asthma.

  • In 2005, 8.9% of children in the United States currently had asthma.

  • Nine million U.S. children under 18 have been diagnosed with asthma at some point in their lifetime.

  • Change of Weather, Exercise and Pollen are some of the common triggers of Asthma!!

  • More than 12 million people in the United States report having an asthma attack in the past year.

  • Asthma accounts for 217,000 emergency room visits and 10.5 million physician office visits every year.

  • In 2006, almost 2.5 million people over the age of 65 had asthma, and more than 1 million had an asthma attack or episode.

  • In a survey of U.S. homes, approximately one-quarter had levels of dust mite allergens present in a bed at a level high enough to trigger asthma symptoms.

  • In 2007, 29% of children who had a food allergy also had asthma.

  • Asthma increases the odds of healthcare use in obese people by 33%.

  • About 23 million people, including almost 7 million children, have asthma.

  • Approximately 2 million Hispanics in the U.S. have asthma.

  • Asthma is the third-ranking cause of hospitalization among children under 15.

  • An average of one out of every 10 school-aged child has asthma.

  • Annual expenditures for health and lost productivity due to asthma are estimated at over $20 billion, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

  • About 23 million people, including almost 7 million children, have asthma.

  • Pine pollen is one of the prolific pollen species, but it luckily one of the least allergenic!

  • Asthma is not an emotional or psychological disease, although strong emotions can sometimes trigger asthma or make symptoms worse. People with asthma have very sensitive lungs that can react to certain things, causing the airways to tighten, swell and

  • The way parents raise their children does not cause asthma. Asthma is not caused by a poor parent-child relationship or being overprotective.

  • Asthma episodes can be very harmful. People can get very sick and need hospitalization. Some people have died from asthma episodes. Frequent asthma episodes, even if they are mild, may cause people to stop being active and living normal lives.

  • Sometimes an asthma episode may come on quite quickly. However, before a person has any wheezing or shortness of breath there are usually symptoms such as a cough, a scratchy throat, or tightness in the chest. Most patients learn to recognize these earl

  • with asthma can monitor how well their lungs are functioning with a peak flow meter. This small device can be used at home, work, or school. The peak flow meter may show that the asthma is getting worse before the usual symptoms appear.

  • Exercise is good for most people – with or without asthma. When asthma is under good control, people with asthma are able to play most sports. For people whose asthma is brought on by exercise, medicines can be taken before exercising to help avoid an

  • Smoking at home increases the development of asthma. Research has shown that smoking or passive smoke increases the chance for children to develop asthma and are more likely to have severe asthma.

  • Corticosteroids provide the most potent and consistently effective long-term control for asthma.

  • Cromolyn can prevent or reduce exercise-induced asthma symptoms if taken 15-30 minutes before exercising.

  • Leukotrienes are potent biochemical substances that play a significant role in asthma attacks.

  • Leukotriene modifiers can sometimes reduce respiratory reactions in patients with sensitivities to aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  • The most serious air pollutant and irritant in terms of asthma is tobacco smoke.

  • Exposure to maternal smoke is a major risk factor in the early onset of asthma in infancy.

  • An infant whose mother smokes is almost twice as likely to develop asthma.

  • For some women, pregnancy may trigger asthma symptoms.

  • About 1 in every 15 children has asthma.

  • More than a half million emergency room visits for children under age 15 are caused by asthma each year.

  • Among chronic diseases, asthma is a major cause of missed school days among children 5 to 17 years old.

  • Childhood asthma symptoms are often worse late at night.

  • About 30% of Americans believe that they are allergic to a specific food, but the real number is much smaller- only about 5% of Americans are actually allergic to certain foods.

  • A Mediterranean diet rich in fish, fruit and veggies are low in saturated fats and packed with antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties that may prevent the risk of children developing asthma.

  • Out of the 20 million people in the U.S. with asthma, more than half have allergic asthma.

  • Allergic asthma is a condition in which exposure to an allergen like mold, pet dander, pollen or dust mites triggers an attack.

  • Antibiotics, analgesics and anti-seizure medications are the most common cause of drug allergies.

  • Asthma conditions may worse as the temperature outside gets hotter due to mercury rises.

  • "Stress is an aggravator for all chronic conditions, including asthma."

  • "An allergic reaction is usually a form of contact dermatitis resulting from continuous contact with the allergen."

  • "Sick days are more common among adults with asthma compared with those without asthma."

  • "Asthma imposes a heavy emotional as well as physical burden of disease on sufferers."

  • The most frequent symptom of asthma is coughing.

  • Asthma exacerbations are periods of symptom worsening, when they become more frequent or more severe.

  • 1/3 of adults and adolescents with asthma in the U.S. have required some form of acute medical care for their asthma in the past 12 months.

  • "Approximately 1 out of 7 asthma patients reported that they have gone to the hospital emergency room for asthma in the past 12 months."

  • "26% of asthma patients reported that their asthma has caused other unscheduled emergency visits in the past 12 months."

  • "8% of adults and adolescents with asthma have lost consciousness during an asthma episode."

  • 3% of adults and adolescents have had a seizure during an asthma episode.

  • "10% of adults have had an asthma episode so bad that they were put in an ICU unit in a hospital."

  • "21% of asthma patients have had an asthma episode so bad that they had been intubated or placed on a breathing machine."

  • "13% of adults and adolescents with asthma had an episode so severe in the past year that they thought their life was in danger."

  • "Only 21% of adults and adolescents with asthma report that an allergist or pulmonologist is the doctor that they usually see for their asthma as a primary source of care."

  • "71% of adults and adolescents with asthma have taken some type of medicine for their asthma in the past 4 weeks."

  • 8% of asthma sufferers take over the counter medicines for quick relief of their asthma.

  • "45% of asthma patients have taken prescription quick relief or rescue medicine for their asthma in the past 4 weeks."

  • "46% of asthma patients have taken prescription medicines for the long-term maintenance of their asthma in the past 4 weeks."

  • "35% of asthma patients do not use inhalers for quick relief from asthma symptoms in the past year."

  • "31% of asthma patients use their rescue inhaler for asthma less than once a week."

  • "10% of asthma patients use their rescue inhaler 1 or 2 times per week."

  • "7% of asthma patients use their rescue inhaler 3-6 times per week."

  • "16% of asthma patients use their rescue inhaler on a daily basis."

  • "35% of adult and asthma patients used an oral steroid to manage their asthma symptoms in the past year."